The taverna has been a cornerstone of Greek life throughout history—artifacts even suggest there was once a taverna at the Acropolis itself. Find out why and eat your way through this eight-day itinerary, sharing your table with olive harvesters, local chefs, Mykonian farmers, and more as you ferry between some of the best islands in the Cyclades.

Highlights

  • Learn how to press oil in a Peloponnesian olive grove
  • Learn to cook traditional cuisine on charming Tinos
  • Visit a working Mykonian farmhouse for dinner
  • Ferry between three of the best islands in the Cyclades

Brief Itinerary

Day Highlights Overnight
Day 1 Arrive in Athens, Welcome Dinner Athens
Day 2 Olive Experience Day Trip Athens
Day 3 Ferry to Tinos Tinos
Day 4 Tinian Culinary Workshop Tinos
Day 5 Ferry to Mykonos, Farm Visit and Mykonian Dinner Mykonos
Day 6 Ferry to Naxos Naxos
Day 7 Naxos Food and Castle Tour Naxos
Day 8 Return to Athens, Depart  

Detailed Itinerary

Day 1: Arrive in Athens, Welcome Dinner

Monastiraki Square and the Acropolis
Monastiraki Square and the Acropolis

Welcome to Greece! You'll begin your trip in Athens, home to both the iconic Acropolis and so much more. The mythology of this spectacular city precedes it, with towering temples to Classical deities and the ruins of ancient marketplaces rubbing shoulders with lively nightlife, crowded flea markets, and contemporary cuisine. Make the most of your time in the city at some of these spots:

  • Check out the views of the can't-miss Parthenon. (Pro tip: The Parthenon is the temple, the Acropolis is the hill.) This temple to Athena has enchanted visitors since its construction was completed in 438 BC. It's probably the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of ancient Greece and is visible from many of the city's high points.
  • Stop at the sprawling National Museum for a crash course in ancient iconography. Be sure to seek out the room housing the Antikythera mechanism, essentially an ancient astronomical computer.
  • Visit a smaller archaeological site at the Tower of the Winds, then stroll down neighboring pedestrian Aiolou Street to stop at shops and cafes. 
  • Find your perfect souvenir or sun hat in the busy stalls of the Monastiraki flea market. 

In the evening, you'll sit down to enjoy either a welcome dinner with views of the Acropolis or wine tasting in a bar in downtown Athens.

Day 2: Olive Experience Day Trip

A favorite in all seasons
A favorite in all seasons

Greece has been enjoying the benefits of olive oil for centuries, and now you can take part in this culinary tradition. You'll begin after breakfast with a drive out to a rural village in the Peloponnese just outside of Nafplio, about 1.5 hours from Athens. Visit the local owners to see how the olive oil-making process works and learn about its steps, as well as meet some of the farm's other inhabitants with a sheep-milking session. 

Next, visit the groves themselves, enjoying a picnic experience underneath the shade of the trees and lunch in a family taverna. If you arrive in the harvest season, your experience will even include picking olives in the orchard alongside the workers. 

Head back to Athens in the late afternoon, where you'll have a new appreciation for your dinner's ingredients among the capital's bustling restaurant scene.

Day 3: Ferry to Tinos

Panagia Evangelistria church
Panagia Evangelistria church

Take an early ferry to Tinos, one of the most overlooked islands of the Cyclades. Tinos has remained under the radar for many years, overshadowed by its celebrity neighbor of Mykonos and seen mainly as a religious destination. Those who continue to believe that, however, are missing out on an island with fascinating history and culture, winding streets, great outdoor activities, and glittering beaches.

The imposing Panagia Evangelistria should not be overlooked, as Tinos is also known as the island of the Virgin Mary. Its icon is believed to have healing powers, and the annual August pilgrimage is a key part of the island's identity as churchgoers crawl on their knees toward the temple as a sign of piety.

If pilgrimage isn't quite your scene, there are also nearly 80 windmills to be explored, Venetian ruins, hiking at Exomvourgo mountain, and beaches for any moods. Try the island's craft beer from Nissos brewery or sample the cheeses at the shop belonging to the Cheese Cooperative of Tinos. Keep an eye out for the many painted dovecotes around the island as well, small white pigeon homes dotting the countryside of which there are nearly 1,000.

Day 4: Tinian Culinary Workshop

Just-picked produce
Fresh greens

Visit an aromatic garden and harvest fresh ingredients as part of this culinary experience. You'll learn the stories of some Greek recipes, then cook them yourself with expert instruction. Enjoy the fruits of your labor al fresco, as you consume your creations under the trees and arched alleyways accompanied with local wines and the scent of the herb garden.

Spend your evening in the main Tinos town and take advantage of the many cafes and tavernas along the seaside or in the interior. Complete your island culinary education with louza, a cured pork that's been refined by Tinians over years of practice, and rich volaki cheese balls and kariki cheese aged within pumpkin skins, similar to a stilton or roquefort. See if the menus offer fourtalia, a fresh Cycladic dish similar to an omelette made with fresh local eggs, sausage, and potatoes, or dishes made out of the signature Tinian artichokes. Complement them with a glass of crisp, light Tinian wine or Nissos beer brewed right on the island.

Day 5: Ferry to Mykonos, Farm Visit and Mykonian Dinner

A mealtime spread
A mealtime spread

You'll take a ferry in the morning to Mykonos, one of the most famous islands in the Cyclades. Known for its glitzy restaurants and nightlife, art scene, and jet set crowds (it was recently home to a Gucci pop-up boutique), Mykonos is one of the most quintessential Greek isles.

After getting settled, you'll pay a visit to a traditional farm in the afternoon. Talk to the farm's caretakers to learn about how vegetables are grown on the islands and how the livestock are raised, and even say hi to the animals.

As the sun begins to set, you'll sit down to a traditional dinner. You'll be welcomed into a local Mykonian household for the meal, where you'll experience the traditional Greek way of life, culture, and cooking. Hear all about their stories of the island's culture and history as well as their own family history, over authentic dishes and free-flowing local wine (for the older crowd).

Day 6: Ferry to Naxos

Looking back from the Portara
Looking back from the Portara

Time to ferry over to bustling Naxos after breakfast. With an active main town where you can shop and admire the Venetian architecture, a historic Kastro (castle) area, and expansive beaches, the island offers opportunities for both laidback relaxation, as well as water or land activities. The rest of the day is yours to unwind as you choose. Try out some of these options:

  • Hike up to the summit of Mount Zas, the mythological childhood home of Zeus, the ruler of the gods, and the highest point in the Cyclades.
  • Head inland to the town of Chalki, home to the island's oldest market and a petite, shady square perfect for whiling away the afternoon. Stop at the kitron distillery to sample the local liqueur and learn about its distillation process over the years.
  • Visit the Temple of Demeter at Sangri on your way. Multiple deities of fertility were worshipped here, particularly the goddess Demeter. The temple was constructed in 530 BC, during the tyranny of Lygdamis, and represents a precursor of classical Athenian architecture. 
  • Stroll to the Portara, the entrance to the Temple of Apollo. Construction on the temple began in the sixth century BCE but was never finished, but the still-standing entranceway has become one of the hallmarks of the island. You can find it on the islet of Palatia, just over a causeway from the heart of Naxos Town (Chora).

For dinner, wander up the hill through the streets of the Kastro neighborhood to pick out your favorite of the area's tavernas, where you can sample the island's fresh produce in its best forms.

Day 7: Naxos Food and Castle Tour

Pass the kitron please
Pass the kitron please

As the largest island in the Cyclades, Naxos is home to a wide range of agriculture in addition to its tourist industry. Livestock live alongside the western farms, home to the famous Naxian potatoes, and mountainous areas full of olive groves provide the staples of Greek cooking.

Your guide will take you through winding lanes of the main Naxos town to sample some of the products of those fields. You'll sample five different Naxian cheeses along with kitron, a traditional liqueur distilled on the island. You may also stop at a candy shop and learn about confectionary production or visit a wine shop to taste Greek varietals. Then, continue on to a historic tour of the Venetian Castle.

Spend the evening continuing to wander the Castle district and put your newfound knowledge to use in the many tavernas on the hillside. For great views over the town and across to neighboring Paros, check out 1739 Terrasse Cafe.

Day 8: Return to Athens, Depart

Wave to the city
Wave to the city

Time to say farewell to Greece. You'll head back to Athens after breakfast to catch your flight, either home or onward to your next adventure.

Map

Map of Cyclades & Peloponnese Culinary Heritage - 8 Days
Map of Cyclades & Peloponnese Culinary Heritage - 8 Days